Underoath "Lost in the Sound of Separation"

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OneWayRawk
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Underoath "Lost in the Sound of Separation"

Unread postby OneWayRawk » Wed Aug 27, 2008 6:17 am

www.myspace.com/underoath

Some of you may have heard of Underoath and some may not but they are a post-hardcore Rock band that are Christiains so if you guys don't like Post-Hardcore music then you may not really enjoy this band at all!!

They are on the indie lable Tooth & Nail/Solid State Records

Their last CD called "Define The Great Line" was released in 2006 and reached up all the way to #2 on the Billboard 200---the highest a Christian band has been on the Billboard since 1997---

I predict that their first week that this CD is released they will either be in the Top 5 if not first place!!

here is some info on the CD:

Lost in the Sound of Separation is the sixth studio album by post-hardcore band Underoath. It is the fourth on Solid State Records, and will be released on September 2, 2008. The band recently spoke to MTV News about the effort, saying it would feature 11 songs that total around 43 minutes. As of June 8, 2008, the record is completely finished, according to McTague. The upcoming release was told to be a lot "heavier" and "darker" than the 2006 release, Define the Great Line. A handful of people from MTV were the first to get a listen to some of the upcoming songs. It was then reviewed afterward that: "Several of the songs were anthemic, feedback-filled numbers that build slowly to their thunderous, ear-splitting crescendos."

OneWayRawk
Major Contributor
Posts: 227
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 2:54 pm
Location: Mission, Georgia

Re: Underoath "Lost in the Sound of Separation"

Unread postby OneWayRawk » Tue Sep 02, 2008 2:53 pm

I bought this CD today (with the limited edition that came with a bonus dvd) and its awesome---this band never does let me down!

Here is parts of a review done by Russ Breimeier

This 43-minute album represents a soul-searching journey of change that takes the listener to hell and back.

The opening thrash of "Breathing in a New Mentality" revolves around the chanted scream, "I'm the desperate and you're the Savior," and when you grasp the words, it's very much a modern psalm pleading for deliverance: "Clean me up, show me how to live/Tear me down, let me start again." Carrying on with the wordy titles, "Anyone Can Dig a Hole…" expresses fear and uncertainty that faith and life are meaningless, yet concludes, "I am the one who's wrong/God forgive me!" And then "A Fault Line a Fault of Mine" plays like a confession, admitting a need for change.

Intense as those songs are, they're not as dark as what follows. "Emergency Broadcast :: The End Is Near" allows fears and pessimism to run rampant with a bleak vision of doom … but representing the world, or inner turmoil? Most likely the latter, as suggested by the similarly hellish "The Only Survivor Was Miraculously Unharmed": "This is how it seems to me/I've drowned myself in self-regret/This is how I wanna be/This can't be how I wanna be." The album's pivotal point seems to come with "We Are the Involuntary" as Gillespie sings about the hope for something more: "Hands in the air and love at our sides/There's gotta be something bigger with the beating in our throats and the tremble in our grip/This can't be it … oh Lord have mercy on us all."

From there the songs turn more hopeful and melodic, as if pointing to light in the darkness. "The Created Void" expresses an understanding of separation caused by sin: "It's all in the way I say what I don't mean, and mean what I don't/I need to speak of you and what is real." Rejecting sin is a lifelong struggle, as heard in "Coming Down Is Calming Down," but we're confronted with a total breakdown of self in "Desperate Times, Desperate Measures." After that, "Too Bright to See Too Loud to Hear" offers striking contrast—almost floating and tranquil, though still punctuated by drums, as a chorus chants, "Good God, can you still get us home?" Concluding the album is "Desolate Earth :: The End Is Here," a mostly instrumental track driven by drum machine, keyboards, and cello, as if surveying the damage of a great holocaust, but then finding something has survived: "You said there was nothing left down here/Well, I roamed around the wasteland/And I swear I found something/I found hope, I found God/I found the dreams of the believers."

The best songs on Lost in the Sound of Separation come in the latter half of the album. They're more melodic and hopeful, yet they also resonate more deeply because of the darkness that precedes them. As such, both halves of the album need each other in the album's depiction of "the end of the world"—not the planet, in this case, but rather the end of sinful nature. Not everyone gets the "noise" of hardcore rock, but it's a genre that lends itself to passionate outbursts. In the context of Christian rock, you sometimes need to let out a good cry or scream before letting God in, and it's in this way that Underoath's latest is both therapeutic and meaningful.

OneWayRawk
Major Contributor
Posts: 227
Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 2:54 pm
Location: Mission, Georgia

Re: Underoath "Lost in the Sound of Separation"

Unread postby OneWayRawk » Wed Sep 10, 2008 4:11 pm

Rock band Underoath lands at No. 8 with the Solid State/Tooth & Nail set "Lost in the Sound of Separation," which sold 56,000. It also debuts at No. 1 on Top Christian Albums. The sextet's last studio set, 2006's "Define the Great Line," arrived at No. 2 on The Billboard 200 with 98,000 and No. 1 on Top Christian Albums.


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